Updates: Issue / Nominations | Mid 2019

Updates

Hello, dear readers, writers and contributors,

It was in mid March — only a little over three months before now — that we began accepting submissions for the fourth issue of Bold + Italic. The entry of genres picked up wonderful pace initially and during the time that numbers were gradually surpassing each previous number, we added to our positivity by nominating some poems for Best Indian Poetry 2019, those being:

• Time Warp, Simran Keshwani

• A Whiff of Spice, Uma Venkatraman

• Black, Divya Devarajan

• A Rube Goldberg Day, Aditya Shankar

We moved further, wrote to each of our nominees and congratulated them. And all this time, on the other side of the road, numerous submissions kept appearing each day, made it to our door: some came in and had to leave even though we wanted them to stay; some stayed a little longer, took tea; some, some more tea; and there were others that never left and happily added up as family. — One is those was Monica Lewis’ humorous THE MOST GOLDEN TICKET, alongside David Appelbaum’s the bicycle man.

All of this did keep us quite busy — and the very added up family now appears as our Issue 04, with artwork by Jeremy Nathan Marks and Anne Casey as our featured poet this time.

It is a wonderful issue — has been compiled to be one — and while we plan to send a set of poems and fiction we published as nominations for Best of the Net this year, please take some time to go through it. It won’t be a time ‘wasted’!

Also, before we leave, we’re still open to creative nonfiction submissions and those of art; however, for the fifth issue, we are also soliciting some of our favourite writers for their wonderful works.

Stay tuned,

Yours,

Lisa, Kat & Jayant

Jeremy Nathan Marks — Equinox

Artwork

Equinox

To begin with, Issue 04 has taken us to newer places — we received more poetry and fiction this time, and only to select a surprisingly lesser amount of those. Moving, then, away from them, this has been the first issue in which we’ve picked up more than just one image to feature.

The artist this time being from London, Ontario. Jeremy Nathan Marks.

While introducing this work, wonderfully titled ‘Equinox’, the artist says:

“I live in a place where a frontier of farms and hungry developers has removed old trees from the skyline, leaving a vast and often violent horizon in front of me. London is the thunderstorm capital of Canada, it also sits in a pocket where tornadoes and lake effect snowstorms are known to wreak havoc. The often treeless plains make for vulnerable coyotes, deer, small mammals and birds. Often, when the sky is not afoot with storms, it hangs over us all in a metallic grey that can persist well into the spring and ring like shots from a long gun.



“Since I come from elsewhere, I have had to learn not only how to engage with this sky but also how to accept it. This piece is a form of compromise: I am treating the great dome as my subject but like the dove in the Noah story, I have brought a branch along to remind me of the land.”


Jeremy Nathan Marks

Jeremy Nathan Marks is a London, Ontario-based writer and amateur photographer. Recent poetry, micro fiction, and photography appear/will appear in Writers Resist, Poets Reading The News, Cajun Mutt, KYSO Flash, Derelict Magazine, As It Ought To Be, The Local Train, Poetry Pacific, Rat’s Ass Review, Front Porch Review, and The Conclusion, among others. His short story, “Detroit 2099” will be published in Stories of the Nature of Cities Anthology 2099 in early summer.

More of his works:

(Art): The Blue Hour | (Poetry): The Wild Word / Malarkey Books / As it Ought to Be / Poetry Pacific / The Hopper / (Nonfiction): The Black Lion Journal | (Interview): The Wire’s Dream Magazine