The Installation in San Francisco of ‘Tides’, a Two-Ton Sculpture by Our Issue 01 Artist, Yoko Kubrick

Artwork, Updates

In the very first issue of Bold + Italic, we had the opportunity to feature a sculpture, titled Tides, inspired by the ocean waves. Kubrick crafted it in Tuscany, Italy of Carrara marble. She tells us it was completed on a commission for the University of San Francisco (commissioned by the graduating class of 1968 for the 50th anniversary of their graduation when it was an all-women’s college – Lone Mountain Women’s College.)

Tides is now located at the top of the Lone Mountain campus staircase in the Sacred Heart Garden – “which for me,” Kubrick says, “is arguably one of the most beautiful views in all of San Francisco.”

“Tides was inspired by the Banzai Pipeline, a surf reef break on the North Shore of Oahu, where I lived as a child. Through this form, I try to express reverence for the beauty, movement, fluidity, and energy of ocean waves. […] I think there is a sort of magic that happens when we can merge with nature in this way.” – Yoko Kubrick, Issue 01

Here is what USF wrote about Tides and its installation in SF: “How to Install a Two Ton Sculpture” – quoting one of the students, “It’s really nice to have a little rest area going up all these stairs to Lone Mountain.”

In another article in the NY Times – “The Sculptor Who Conceives Classical Myths,” – Nick Marino writes about her work that the “piece doesn’t have a front or back, so you’re never certain how to view it; the only focal point is a suggestive hole that Kubrick bored through the middle.” To which, Kubrick suggests that such sculptures “give a larger space for interpretation; if you see a perfect image of something that’s classical realism, it doesn’t leave as much room for the imagination.”

A dream accomplished for her, Kubrick informs us that of the 358 public artworks in San Francisco listed in the Smithsonian’s online catalogue, only 15% are by women artists. (a sad fact?)


yokoworkingangleginder

Yoko Kubrick is an American sculptor of Japanese and Czech heritage. She grew up in Guam, Hawaii, California and former Czechoslovakia, the contrasting cultures from where aroused her interest in the arts and now inform her work as a sculptor. She studied briefly at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Carrara (in Carrara, Italy) before leaving to work alongside professional sculptors in a marble atelier. She currently divides her time between the San Francisco Bay Area and Tuscany, Italy. Find her here!

Amar Saeed’s “Views Through a Lens”

Artwork

Amar, how so good?

“Not very good really! My journey with the lenses hasn’t been a long one to count. It began hardly over an year ago but, fortunately, it has been nothing short of amazing. While looking at them, and even later, photographs are like musical notes to me, each having a different emotion (or rather very often a lot of different emotions). However, talking of the process — how I think of it — I don’t just click photos with my camera, I press a pause button in time and capture the moment, but yes! I still have a lot to learn and many journeys to embark on. And very hopefully, I still have a lot of stories to create.”


amar-saeed

Amar Saeed, a second-year student of Medicine in SKIMS, India, is an amateur photographer. A coffee-, nature- and animal-lover, with an interest in writing, reading and learning, where he lives is a major part of what inspires him. “Views Through a Lens” is his first online publication. Find him here, and on twitter!

Jeremy Nathan Marks — Equinox

Artwork

Equinox

To begin with, Issue 04 has taken us to newer places — we received more poetry and fiction this time, and only to select a surprisingly lesser amount of those. Moving, then, away from them, this has been the first issue in which we’ve picked up more than just one image to feature.

The artist this time being from London, Ontario. Jeremy Nathan Marks.

While introducing this work, wonderfully titled ‘Equinox’, the artist says:

“I live in a place where a frontier of farms and hungry developers has removed old trees from the skyline, leaving a vast and often violent horizon in front of me. London is the thunderstorm capital of Canada, it also sits in a pocket where tornadoes and lake effect snowstorms are known to wreak havoc. The often treeless plains make for vulnerable coyotes, deer, small mammals and birds. Often, when the sky is not afoot with storms, it hangs over us all in a metallic grey that can persist well into the spring and ring like shots from a long gun.



“Since I come from elsewhere, I have had to learn not only how to engage with this sky but also how to accept it. This piece is a form of compromise: I am treating the great dome as my subject but like the dove in the Noah story, I have brought a branch along to remind me of the land.”


Jeremy Nathan Marks

Jeremy Nathan Marks is a London, Ontario-based writer and amateur photographer. Recent poetry, micro fiction, and photography appear/will appear in Writers Resist, Poets Reading The News, Cajun Mutt, KYSO Flash, Derelict Magazine, As It Ought To Be, The Local Train, Poetry Pacific, Rat’s Ass Review, Front Porch Review, and The Conclusion, among others. His short story, “Detroit 2099” will be published in Stories of the Nature of Cities Anthology 2099 in early summer.

More of his works:

(Art): The Blue Hour | (Poetry): The Wild Word / Malarkey Books / As it Ought to Be / Poetry Pacific / The Hopper / (Nonfiction): The Black Lion Journal | (Interview): The Wire’s Dream Magazine